A brat becomes an average kid with a strange family with this week's book.

Banned

#52 on Top 100 Banned/Challenged Books: 2000-2009

1983 - Kansas - Challenged at Lowell Elementary School in Salina for the language "God," "damn," and "hell"

1985 - Minnesota - Challenged at Orchard Lake Elementary School in Burnsville because "the book took the Lord's name in vain" and had "over forty instances of profanity

1988 - Colorado - Challenged at the Jefferson County schools because "Gilly's friends lie and steal, and there are no repercussions. Christians are portrayed as being dumb and stupid."

1991 - Connecticut - Pulled but later restored at four Cheshire elementary school for being "filled with profanity, blasphemy and obscenities, and gutter language."

1992 - Texas - Challenged at Alamo Heights School District for language such as "hell" and "damn"

1993 - Kansas - Challenged at the Walnut Elementary School in Emporia by parents for graphic violence and language

1997 - Nevada - Challenged yet retained for explicit language in the Lander County School District

Sources

ALA. "Top 100 Banned/Challenged Books: 2000-2009." Retrieved January 9, 2018 from http://www.ala.org/advocacy/bbooks/top-100-bannedchallenged-books-2000-2009

Doyle, Robert P. "Banned Books: Challenging Our Freedom to Read." American Library Association, 2014.

"Katherine's Biography." Katherine Paterson's Website. AuthorsOnTheWeb; 2016. Retrieved on December 23, 2017 from http://katherinepaterson.com/biography/

Paterson, Katherine. "The Great Gilly Hopkins." Avon Books, 1978.

A crazy, racist little fairy tale, Sambo learns to steal from bullies and eat hella pancakes.

Banned

1956 - Canada - Removed by the Toronto, Ontario board of education after complaints from several groups that "the popular book was a cause of mental suffering to Negroes in particular and children in general."

1959 - New York - A black resident of New York City challenged the book at a school library, calling it racially derogatory. The book was eventually restored to library shelves.

1964 - Nebraska - School superintendent of Lincoln school system ordered it removed from open shelves due to the inherent racism of the book. The book was placed on reserved shelves with a note explaining it would be available as optional material.

1971 - Alabama - Montgomery schools banned the book for being "inappropriate" and "not in keeping with good human relations."

1972

United Kingdom - General attack in schools and libraries for symbolizing "the kind of dangerous and obsolete books that must go."

Canada - Hamilton, Ontario teachers ordered students to tear the story from their books; the Montreal-based Canadian National Black Coalition began a war to remove the book from school and library shelves; New Brunswick banned it entirely.

Texas - Dallas school libraries removed the book because it "distorts a child's view of black people."

Sources

Associated Press. "COMPANY NEWS; Sambo's to Alter Northeast Names." New York Times, 1981. Retrieved January 5, 2018 from http://www.nytimes.com/1981/03/11/business/company-news-sambo-s-to-alter-northeast-names.html

Bannerman, Helen. "Little Black Sambo." Applewood Books, 1921. Bedford, Massachusetts.

Doyle, Robert P. "Banned Books: Challenging Our Freedom to Read." American Library Association, 2014.

Golus, Carrie. "Sambo’s subtext." Chicago Magazine. 2010. Retrieved January 5, 2018 from http://magazine.uchicago.edu/1010/chicago_journal/sambos-subtext.shtml

Pancake Parlour. "Helen Bannerman on the Train to Kodaikanal." Retrieved January 5, 2018 from http://web.archive.org/web/20060820084143/http://pancakeparlour.com/Wonderland/Highlights/Thefuture/Short_Stories/Bannerman/bannerman.html

Banned for language and moral/religious reasons, we get into the story of a little girl with family problems and the old man she thinks is taking her friend.

Banned

1989 - New Jersey - Challenged at Bernardsville schools for being offensive to several parents on moral and religious grounds.

1993 - Pennsylvania - Challenged in the Gettysburg public schools for offensive language

Sources

Doyle, Robert P. "Banned Books: Challenging Our Freedom to Read." American Library Association, 2014.

"Katherine's Biography." Katherine Paterson's Website. AuthorsOnTheWeb; 2016. Retrieved on December 23, 2017 from http://katherinepaterson.com/biography/

Paterson, Katherine. Jacob Have I Loved. HarperTrophy, 1980.

From the deep Depression-era south is a story of hope and hatred and one family's story.

Banned

1993 - Louisiana - Arcadia High School removed from ninth-grade reading list for racial bias.

1998 - California - Challenged at O'Hara Park Middle School in Oakley for "racial epithets."

2000 - Alabama - Challenged at Chapman Elementary School libraries in Huntsville for "racial slurs in dialogue to make points about racism."

2004 - Florida - Challenged but retained at Seminole County school curriculum after an African American family raised concerns about the book, finding it inappropriate for their thirteen-year-old son.

Sources

Crowe, Chris. "Mildred D.Taylor." The Mississippi writer's Page. University of Mississippi, 2015. Retrieved 8 Dec 2017 from http://mwp.olemiss.edu//dir/taylor_mildred/

Doyle, Robert P. "Roll of Thunder Hear My Cry." Banned Books: Challenging Our Freedom to Read. ALA, 2014.

The library delves into the Gospel of Matthew with this biblical translation that brought Jesus to the English masses and totally got the author murdered by the state.

Banned

1526 - England - As the first English-language version of the New Testament, it was also the first print book banned in England. Translating the original Greek and Hebrew into present speech was illegal. Tyndale tried to publish it in Cologne in 1525 and succeeded in 1526 in Worms anonymously. Six thousand copies were smuggled into England and and publically burned. One copy survived in the library of Baptist College in Bristol. Reprints were continually published despite ban.

1534 - England - Church authorities attempted to extradite Tyndale from Europe. He continued publishing revisions under his own name before being arrested in 1535. He was imprisoned, strangled at the stake, and burned with copies of his translations of the Bible. Around 50,000 copies in seven additions were in circulation the time of his death.

1546 - England - The Archbishop of Canterbury issued a new ban, citing references to church functionaries as "horse-leeches, maggots, and caterpillars in a kingdom." Tyndale's works were to be burned when found.

1555 - England - Queen Mary issued a ban for false doctrines against the Catholic faith.

Sources

BBC. "William Tyndale." BBC, 2017. Retrieved 17 November 24 from http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/people/william_tyndale/

Christianity Today. "William Tyndale." Christianity Today, 2017. Retrieved on 17 November 23 from http://www.christianitytoday.com/history/people/scholarsandscientists/william-tyndale.html

Doyle, Robert P. "Banned Books: Challenging Our Freedom to Read." American Library Association, 2014.

Tyndale, William. "William Tyndale's New Testament." Wordsworth Classics of World Literature, 2002.

Posted
AuthorBanned Library

A small New England town is rocked by the scandal of everyday life in one of the most forgotten popular books of the twentieth century.

Banned

1957 - Tennessee - Knoxville activated a city ordinance that said the City Board of Review could block items deemed obscene. Local booksellers were forbidden to sell it. One newsstand owner challenged the ordinance and it was ruled unconsitutional.

1958

Ireland - Banned until the introduction of the Censorship of Publications Bill in 1967.

Canada - Temporary ban lifted

1959 - Rhode Island - The Rhonde Island Commission to Encourage Morality in Youth bought action against Bantam and three other New York paperback publishers. The Rhode Island Superior Court upheld the decision, which was later reversed by the U.S. Supreme Court in Bantam Boos, Inc, et al, v. Joseph A Sullivan, et al.

Sources

Callahan, Michael. "Peyton Places' Real Victim." Vanity Fair. Retrieved on 2017 Nov 1 from https://www.vanityfair.com/news/2006/03/peytonplace200603

Doyle, Robert P. "Banned Books: Challenging Our Freedom to Read." American Library Association, 2014.

Metalious, Grace. "Peyton Place." Northeastern Univsersity Press. Boston, 1956, 1999.

Sex and violence abound as we meet Vivian, a young werewolf trying to make her way in the world and get some hot man meat. Possibly by eating him.

Banned

2001 - Texas - Temporarily pulled from LaPorte Independent School District library shelves for review and possibly amend its selection policies

#57 Top 100 Banned/Challenged Books: 2000-2009

South Carolina

teacher called it 'low-level filth that corrupts'

Greenville schools removed the book but eventually returned it to the shelves

Texas

woman called author at her work to say she was asking for the book to be removed from her daughter's high school library because, in author's words, "I had allowed a teenaged girl to accept and even revel in her own sexuality."

"Cullen Middle School... stated that the book contained profanity, sexual content or nudity, and violence or horror."

Contains (according to Common Sense Media) violence, sex, language, consumerism, drinking, drugs, and smoking

Sources

ALA. "Top 100 Banned/Challenged Books: 2000-2009." Retrieved on 17 Aug 01 from http://www.ala.org/advocacy/bbooks/top-100-bannedchallenged-books-2000-2009

Ehrlich, Brenna. "WHAT DID THIS YA AUTHOR DO TO GET BANNED FROM SCHOOL LIBRARIES?" MTV News, 2014. Retrieved 2017 September 29 from http://www.mtv.com/news/1944296/banned-books-week-annette-curtis-klause/

Doyle, Robert P. Banned Books: Challenging Our Freedom to Read. ALA. 2014.

Klause, Annette Curtis. Blood and Chocolate. Delacorte Press, 1997.

Wheadon, Carrie R. "Blood and Chocolate book review." Common Sense Media. Retrieved 2017 September 29 from https://www.commonsensemedia.org/book-reviews/blood-and-chocolate#

YALSA 1998 Best Books. Retrieved Sept 29, 2017 from https://web.archive.org/web/20061204100859/http://www.ala.org/ala/yalsa/booklistsawards/bestbooksya/1998bestbooks.htm


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"Dances and Dames." Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com). Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/

Part 1 - We start at the beginning with the murders of a little boy and a gay man while Stan, Richie, Ben, Eddie, and Beverly are called home because they promised.

Banned

1987

Nebraska - Challenged in Lincoln school libraries because of the novel's "corruptive, obscene nature."

1992

New York - Placed on a "closed shelf" a the Franklinville Central High School library for sexual content, violence, and language. Parental permission required to check out by students.

Sources

ALA. "Top 100 Banned/Challenged Books: 2000-2009." Retrieved on 17 Aug 01 from http://www.ala.org/advocacy/bbooks/top-100-bannedchallenged-books-2000-2009

Doyle, Robert P. Banned Books: Challenging Our Freedom to Read. ALA, 2014.

King, Stephen. "It." Pocket Books. New York: 2016.

King, Stephen. "Book-Banners: Adventure in Censorship Is Stranger Than Fiction, The." StephenKing.com, 2000-2012. Retrieved on 17 Aug 22 from http://www.stephenking.com/library/essay/book-banners:_adventure_in_censorship_is_stranger_than_fiction_the.html

Schnelbach, Leah. "Stephen King: An Unlikely Lifeline In Turbulent Waters." Tor.com. Macmillian, 2017. Retrieved on 17 Aug 22 from https://www.tor.com/2013/09/26/banned-books-week-stephen-king/

World's Without End. "1987 Award Winners and Nominees." icow.com, 2017. Retrieved on 17 Aug 22 from https://www.worldswithoutend.com/books_year_index.asp?year=1987

Stephen King's It [USED]
9.99

Own the October 2017 book of the Banned Library Podcast, Stephen King's It. Has all the notes and random musings and stains from the library.

From the back cover:

Can an entire city be haunted? The Losers' Club of 1958 seems to think so. After all, when they were teenagers back then, these seven friends who called the small New England metropolis of Derry their home had first-hand experience with what made this place so horribly different. 

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We begin with the book that taught us that Germans are people, too! Young Patty learns about the world in her small town.

If you or anyone you know is a victim of domestic abuse, please do not be afraid to reach out.  You are not alone and please know that someone loves you and wants you to be okay.  Reach out at https://www.childhelp.org/hotline/ or call The Childhelp National Child Abuse Hotline 1-800-4-A-CHILD (1-800-422-4453) or at your local school, shelter, or safe place.

Banned

1990 - Connecticut - Challeged in curriculum at Burlington and Hawinton schools for profanity and "subject matter that set bad examples and gives students negative views of life."

1996 - New Jersey - Temporarily removed from 8th grade supplemental reading list in Cinnaminson for "offiensive racial stereotypes."

2002 - Challenged for racism, offensive language, and being sexually explicit.

#55 Top 100 Banned/Challenged Books: 2000-2009

Sources

ALA. "Top 100 Banned/Challenged Books: 2000-2009." Retrieved on 17 Aug 01 from http://www.ala.org/advocacy/bbooks/top-100-bannedchallenged-books-2000-2009

Doyle, Robert P. Banned Books: Challenging Our Freedom to Read. ALA. 2014.

Greene, Bette. Summer of My German Soldier. Bantam Starfire. 1983.

Marshall University Libraries. "SUMMER OF MY GERMAN SOLDIER." Retrieved on 17 Aug 01 from http://www.marshall.edu/library/bannedbooks/books/summergerman.asp

Summer of My German Soldier by Bette Greene [USED]
3.49

Own the September 2017 book of the Banned Library Podcast, Summer of My German Soldier. Has all the notes and random musings and stains from the library.

From the back cover:

"The summer that Patty Bergen turns twelve is a summer that will ahunt her forever. When her small hometown in Arkansas becomes the site of a camp housing German Prisoners during World War II, Patty learns what it means to open her heart. Even though she's Jewish, she begins to see a prison escapee, Anton, not as a Nazi, but as a lonely, frightened young man with feelings not unlike her own."

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Posted
AuthorBanned Library
CategoriesYA Book

An angsty kid meet some new friends in this heartbreaking tale of whiny smokers cussing a lot.

Banned

2008 - New York - Challenged, but retained for the 11th grade Regents English classes in Depew despite concerns about graphic language and sexual content. The school sent parents a letter requesting permission to use the novel and only 3 students were denied permission.

2012 - Tennessee - Challenged as required reading for Knox County High Schools' Honors and as Advanced Placement outside readings for English II because of "inappropriate language." School Superintendent Dr. James P. McIntyre, Jr. said that a parent identified this as an issue and the book was removed from the required reading list. He didn't say whether the book was still in the schools.

2013

Colorado - Parents of Fort Lupton Middle and High School challenged the books use in a 9th grade classrooms for sexual and alcohol content

Tennessee - Banned as required reading for Sumner County schools by the director of schools because of a sex scene that was "a bit much" and  "inappropriate language." The book was retained in the libraries.

2014 - New Jersey - Challenged in the Verona High School curriculum because a parent found the sexual nature of the story inappropriate.

2015 - Wisconsin - Challenged, but retained in the Waukesha South High School despite claims the book is "too racy to read."

2016

Kentucky - Marion County parent complained about book being included on 12th grade english, "calls the novel “filth” and lists his fear that the book would tempt students “to experiment with pornography, sex, drugs, alcohol and profanity.”" The book was removed from circulation until the school committee reached a decision. "Another resident has written to the local paper describing the novel as “mental pornography” and detailing the number of times the “‘f’ word” is used (16) and the the “‘sh’ word” is used (27)."

New Jersey - Challenged, but retained in the Lumberton Township middle school despite a parent questioning its "sexual content."

Sources

Doyle, Robert P. Banned Books: Challenging Our Freedom to Read. ALA. 2014.

Guardian - John Green fights back against banning of Looking for Alaska

Guardian - US battle over banning Looking for Alaska continues in Kentucky

Marshall University Libraries - Banned Books - Looking for Alaska

National Coalation Against Censorship - Looking for Alaska Under Fire in Kentucky

NJ.com - N.J. school district bans John Green's 'Looking for Alaska'

Office of Intellectual Freedom Blog - Here and Here

School Library Journal - Ban on John Green’s ‘Looking for Alaska’ Sparks Anger

School Library Journal - John Green Says ‘Looking for Alaska’ Challenged by Colorado Parents

Looking for Alaska by John Green [Used and Beaten]
6.99

Before: it was a book Amazon and other book stores were selling that was chosen for a podcast. It taught us to laugh, love, and never to drink milk mixed with vodka. Also, there's some young kids acting older than they are.

After: it's still a book, but with a whole lot more pencil marks on it. Maybe a tear stain or two.

Do you listen to the Banned Library Podcast? Do you wonder if we read all the books we talk about? Well, we read this one and marked it all up to hell and back with notes for the podcast. Own it today!

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