A collection of poems by teenagers so get ready for some modern angst of Holden Caulfield levels.

Banned

#53 on Top 100 Banned/Challenged Books: 2000-2009

2003 - Georgia - Challenged by "a parent concerned about the book's language and topics" in Houston County public schools

Sources

ALA. "Top 100 Banned/Challenged Books: 2000-2009." Retrieved on 17 Aug 01 from http://www.ala.org/advocacy/bbooks/top-100-bannedchallenged-books-2000-2009

Doyle, Robert P. Banned Books: Challenging Our Freedom to Read. ALA. 2014.

Franco, Betsy, ed. "You Hear Me?: Poems and Writings by Teenage Boys." Candlewick Press. Somerville, Massachusetts: 2000.

Poetry Foundation. "Betsy Franco." Chicago, IL: 2018. Retrieved March 31, 2018 from https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poets/betsy-franco

Titus, Ron. "You Hear Me?: Poems and Writings by Teenaged Boys." Marshall University Libraries. 2011. Retrieved March 31, 2018 from http://www.marshall.edu/library/bannedbooks/books/youhearme.asp

 

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"Dances and Dames." Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com). Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/

A Time to Kill: A Novel
By John Grisham

When a black man kills the men who raped his daughter, a small southern town loses its damn mind.

Banned

#67 on ALA's Top 100 Banned/Challenged Books: 2000-2009

2005 - North Dakota - Challenged but retained at Fargo North High School advanced English classes despite complaints of graphic rape and murder scenes

Sources

ALA. "Top 100 Banned/Challenged Books: 2000-2009." Retrieved on 17 Aug 01 from http://www.ala.org/advocacy/bbooks/top-100-bannedchallenged-books-2000-2009

Doyle, Robert P. Banned Books: Challenging Our Freedom to Read. ALA. 2014.

Grisham, John. A Time to Kill. Doubleday. New York, 1989.

 

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"Dances and Dames." Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com). Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/

Posted
AuthorBanned Library
CategoriesAdult Fiction
Thirteen Reasons Why
By Jay Asher

A problematic author with a story containing a very muddled message about suicide.

Banned

2012 - 3rd most challenged book, according to ALA; Challenged for drugs, alcohol, smoking, being sexually explicit, suicide, and being unsuited for age group

2017

Alberta, Canada - St. Vincent Elementary School in Edmonton banned all mention of the series on campus

Colorado - At Mesa County School District, the curriculum director ordered librarians to stop circulating the book. Librarians and counselors deliberated for three hours and determined the book was not as graphic as the TV series. Parents in the school distrcit recieved notices alerting them to the possible influence of the series.

Illinois - Challenged and under review in the sophomore-level Academic English II classes at Lemont Hishg School District 210 because a parent considered it "pornographic."

Sources

ALA. "Top 100 Banned/Challenged Books: 2000-2009." Retrieved on 17 Aug 01 from http://www.ala.org/advocacy/bbooks/top-100-bannedchallenged-books-2000-2009

Ahsan, Sadaf. "Netflix adds trigger warnings to 13 Reasons Why after Canadian school board bans series for 'glamorizing' suicide." National Post. May 2, 2017. Retrieved March 9, 2017 from http://nationalpost.com/entertainment/television/netflix-adds-trigger-warnings-to-13-reasons-why-after-canadian-school-board-bans-series-for-glamorizing-suicide

Asher, Jay. Thirteen Reasons Why. Razorbill. New York, 2007.

Collins, Cathy. "Thirteen Reasons Why Controversy." Intellectual Freedom Blog. The Office for Intellectual Freedom of the American Library Association. June 7, 2017. Retrieved on March 9, 2018 from http://www.oif.ala.org/oif/?p=9793

Highfill, Samantha. "13 Reasons Why: Netflix says Jay Asher 'was not involved' in season 2." EW.com. Retrieved on March 9, 2018 from http://ew.com/tv/2018/02/13/13-reasons-why-season-2-jay-asher/

Titus, Ron. "Thirteen Reasons Why." Marshall University Libraries. June 28, 2017.  Retrieved on March 9, 2018 from http://www.marshall.edu/library/bannedbooks/books/thirteenreasonswhy.asp


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"Dances and Dames." Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com). Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/

Speak
By Laurie Halse Anderson

High school is crazy, right? Like that one time you called the cops because of a super tramatic event but all your friends thought you were being a killjoy. Memories.

Banned

#60 on ALA's Top 100 Banned/Challenged Books: 2000-2009

2010 - Missouri - Parents of Republic School District were cautioned by assistant professor of management at Missouri State University that the book was "soft-pornography" and "glorifies drinking, cursing, and premarital sex," as well as teaching principles contrary to the Bible.


Sources

ALA. "Top 100 Banned/Challenged Books: 2000-2009." Retrieved on Feburary 24, 2018 from http://www.ala.org/advocacy/bbooks/top-100-bannedchallenged-books-2000-2009

Anderson, Laurie Halse. Speak. Farrar Straus Giroux, 1999.

Doll, Jen. "The Voice of 'Speak' Is Loud as Ever." The Atlantic, 2012. Retrieved Feburary 24, 2018 from https://www.theatlantic.com/entertainment/archive/2012/10/voice-speak-loud-ever/322345/

Doyle, Robert P. Banned Books: Challenging Our Freedom to Read. ALA. 2014.

Jensen, Kelly. "15 YEARS OF SPEAK: AN INTERVIEW WITH LAURIE HALSE ANDERSON." Book Riot, 2014. Retrieved February 24, 2018 from https://bookriot.com/2014/04/08/15-years-speak-interview-laurie-halse-anderson/

Staino, Rocco. "Anderson’s Speak Under Attack, Again." School Library Journal, 2010. Retrieved on February 24, 2018 from https://www.slj.com/2010/10/industry-news/andersons-speak-under-attack-again/


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"Dances and Dames." Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com). Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/

Fahrenheit 451
By Ray Bradbury

It was a pleasure to burn through this book and explain that people are dummies for banning a book on book banning.

Banned

1967 - Ballantine Books released the "Bal-Hi Edition" aimed at high school students which censored such words as "hell" and "damn" and "drunk man" became a "sick man."

1987 - Florida - The book was given "third tier" status under a homegrown book classification system at Bay County Schools in Panama City meaning it contained "vulgarity." After much controversy, the school abandoned the tier system and the book was placed in the curriculum.

1992 - California - Irvine school Venado Middle School censored after students received copies with words such as "hell" and "damn". Parents complained and reporters contacted the school so officials said the censored copies would not be used

2006 - Texas - Challenged at Conroe Independent School District for "discussion of being drunk, smoking cigarettes, violence, 'dirty talk,' reference to the Bible, and using God's name in vain," going against "religious beliefs."

Sources

ALA. "Top 100 Banned/Challenged Books: 2000-2009." Retrieved on 17 Aug 01 from http://www.ala.org/advocacy/bbooks/top-100-bannedchallenged-books-2000-2009

Bradbury, Ray. Fahrenheit 451. Ballantine Books. New York, 1953.

Doyle, Robert P. Banned Books: Challenging Our Freedom to Read. ALA. 2014.

Library of Congress. "Banned Books That Shaped America." Bannedbooksweek.org. Retrieved on February 20, 2018 from http://www.bannedbooksweek.org/censorship/bannedbooksthatshapedamerica


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"Dances and Dames." Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com). Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/

Vonnegut dies to bring you news from the Pearly Gates, interviewing notable dead people about their lives and thoughts on current events.

Banned

No specific instances, but some comment on Vonnegut's take on religion, death, the afterlife, and controversial topics.

Sources

Vonnegut, Kurt. God Bless You, Dr. Kevorkian. Seven Stories Press. New York, 1999.


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Posted
AuthorBanned Library

A woman loses her husband and is not that broken up about it and that broke people up about it.

Banned

  • Scandalous by the people of the time (1890s) because the woman is not upset, even exhilarated, by the death of her husband.

Sources

Chopin, Kate. "Story of an Hour." A Vocation and a Voice. Penguin Books. 1991.

Clark, Pamela. "Biography." KateChopin.org. 2018. Retrieved Febrary 11, 2018 from https://www.katechopin.org/biography/

More, Lois. "Story Time for Grown-Ups: "The Story of An Hour" by Kate Chopin." New York Public Library. 2014. Retrieved February 11, 2018 from https://www.nypl.org/blog/2014/03/18/storytime-grownups-kate-chopin-story-hour


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"Dances and Dames." Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com). Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/

Posted
AuthorBanned Library
CategoriesStory Time

A small town holds a very special lottery and people were super mad about it.

Banned

1981 - Minnesota - the film version of the story was banned in Forest Lake but reinstated by U. S. District Court Judge

South Africa - Country banned the story as it attacked reliance on traditional values and blindly following traditions, such as apartheid

Readers of the New Yorker responded more to this story than any story previously published in a largely negative fashion. Subscriptions were cancelled, and most mail expressed both confusion and anger.

Sources

Doyle, Robert P. Banned Books: Challenging Our Freedom to Read. ALA. 2014.

Franklin, Ruth. "“The Lottery” Letters." New Yorker. 2013. Retrieved January 27, 2018 from https://www.newyorker.com/books/page-turner/the-lottery-letters

McCarthy, Erin. "11 Facts About Shirley Jackson's "The Lottery"." Mental Floss. Retrieved January 27, 2018 from http://mentalfloss.com/article/57503/11-facts-about-shirley-jacksons-lottery

Jackson, Shirley. "The Lottery." The Lottery and Other Stories. Modern Library. New York, 1949.


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"Dances and Dames." Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com). Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/

Posted
AuthorBanned Library
CategoriesShort Story