Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury

by Banned Library in


Fahrenheit 451
By Ray Bradbury

It was a pleasure to burn through this book and explain that people are dummies for banning a book on book banning.

Banned

1967 - Ballantine Books released the "Bal-Hi Edition" aimed at high school students which censored such words as "hell" and "damn" and "drunk man" became a "sick man."

1987 - Florida - The book was given "third tier" status under a homegrown book classification system at Bay County Schools in Panama City meaning it contained "vulgarity." After much controversy, the school abandoned the tier system and the book was placed in the curriculum.

1992 - California - Irvine school Venado Middle School censored after students received copies with words such as "hell" and "damn". Parents complained and reporters contacted the school so officials said the censored copies would not be used

2006 - Texas - Challenged at Conroe Independent School District for "discussion of being drunk, smoking cigarettes, violence, 'dirty talk,' reference to the Bible, and using God's name in vain," going against "religious beliefs."

Sources

ALA. "Top 100 Banned/Challenged Books: 2000-2009." Retrieved on 17 Aug 01 from http://www.ala.org/advocacy/bbooks/top-100-bannedchallenged-books-2000-2009

Bradbury, Ray. Fahrenheit 451. Ballantine Books. New York, 1953.

Doyle, Robert P. Banned Books: Challenging Our Freedom to Read. ALA. 2014.

Library of Congress. "Books That Shaped America." Retrieved on April 16, 2019 from https://www.loc.gov/bookfest/books-that-shaped-america/


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"Dances and Dames." Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com). Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/




The Great Gilly Hopkins by Katherine Paterson

by Banned Library in ,


The Great Gilly Hopkins
By Katherine Paterson

A brat becomes an average kid with a strange family with this week's book.

Banned

#52 on Top 100 Banned/Challenged Books: 2000-2009

1983 - Kansas - Challenged at Lowell Elementary School in Salina for the language "God," "damn," and "hell"

1985 - Minnesota - Challenged at Orchard Lake Elementary School in Burnsville because "the book took the Lord's name in vain" and had "over forty instances of profanity

1988 - Colorado - Challenged at the Jefferson County schools because "Gilly's friends lie and steal, and there are no repercussions. Christians are portrayed as being dumb and stupid."

1991 - Connecticut - Pulled but later restored at four Cheshire elementary school for being "filled with profanity, blasphemy and obscenities, and gutter language."

1992 - Texas - Challenged at Alamo Heights School District for language such as "hell" and "damn"

1993 - Kansas - Challenged at the Walnut Elementary School in Emporia by parents for graphic violence and language

1997 - Nevada - Challenged yet retained for explicit language in the Lander County School District

Sources

ALA. "Top 100 Banned/Challenged Books: 2000-2009." Retrieved January 9, 2018 from http://www.ala.org/advocacy/bbooks/top-100-bannedchallenged-books-2000-2009

Doyle, Robert P. "Banned Books: Challenging Our Freedom to Read." American Library Association, 2014.

"Katherine's Biography." Katherine Paterson's Website. AuthorsOnTheWeb; 2016. Retrieved on December 23, 2017 from http://katherinepaterson.com/biography/

Paterson, Katherine. "The Great Gilly Hopkins." Avon Books, 1978.




Little Black Sambo by Helen Bannerman

by Banned Library in


Little Black Sambo
By Helen Bannerman

A crazy, racist little fairy tale, Sambo learns to steal from bullies and eat hella pancakes.

Banned

1956 - Canada - Removed by the Toronto, Ontario board of education after complaints from several groups that "the popular book was a cause of mental suffering to Negroes in particular and children in general."

1959 - New York - A black resident of New York City challenged the book at a school library, calling it racially derogatory. The book was eventually restored to library shelves.

1964 - Nebraska - School superintendent of Lincoln school system ordered it removed from open shelves due to the inherent racism of the book. The book was placed on reserved shelves with a note explaining it would be available as optional material.

1971 - Alabama - Montgomery schools banned the book for being "inappropriate" and "not in keeping with good human relations."

1972

United Kingdom - General attack in schools and libraries for symbolizing "the kind of dangerous and obsolete books that must go."

Canada - Hamilton, Ontario teachers ordered students to tear the story from their books; the Montreal-based Canadian National Black Coalition began a war to remove the book from school and library shelves; New Brunswick banned it entirely.

Texas - Dallas school libraries removed the book because it "distorts a child's view of black people."

Sources

Associated Press. "COMPANY NEWS; Sambo's to Alter Northeast Names." New York Times, 1981. Retrieved January 5, 2018 from http://www.nytimes.com/1981/03/11/business/company-news-sambo-s-to-alter-northeast-names.html

Bannerman, Helen. "Little Black Sambo." Applewood Books, 1921. Bedford, Massachusetts.

Doyle, Robert P. "Banned Books: Challenging Our Freedom to Read." American Library Association, 2014.

Golus, Carrie. "Sambo’s subtext." Chicago Magazine. 2010. Retrieved January 5, 2018 from http://magazine.uchicago.edu/1010/chicago_journal/sambos-subtext.shtml

Pancake Parlour. "Helen Bannerman on the Train to Kodaikanal." Retrieved January 5, 2018 from http://web.archive.org/web/20060820084143/http://pancakeparlour.com/Wonderland/Highlights/Thefuture/Short_Stories/Bannerman/bannerman.html




Blood and Chocolate by Annette Curtis Klause

by Banned Library in


Sex and violence abound as we meet Vivian, a young werewolf trying to make her way in the world and get some hot man meat. Possibly by eating him.

Banned

2001 - Texas - Temporarily pulled from LaPorte Independent School District library shelves for review and possibly amend its selection policies

#57 Top 100 Banned/Challenged Books: 2000-2009

South Carolina

teacher called it 'low-level filth that corrupts'

Greenville schools removed the book but eventually returned it to the shelves

Texas

woman called author at her work to say she was asking for the book to be removed from her daughter's high school library because, in author's words, "I had allowed a teenaged girl to accept and even revel in her own sexuality."

"Cullen Middle School... stated that the book contained profanity, sexual content or nudity, and violence or horror."

Contains (according to Common Sense Media) violence, sex, language, consumerism, drinking, drugs, and smoking

Sources

ALA. "Top 100 Banned/Challenged Books: 2000-2009." Retrieved on 17 Aug 01 from http://www.ala.org/advocacy/bbooks/top-100-bannedchallenged-books-2000-2009

Ehrlich, Brenna. "WHAT DID THIS YA AUTHOR DO TO GET BANNED FROM SCHOOL LIBRARIES?" MTV News, 2014. Retrieved 2017 September 29 from http://www.mtv.com/news/1944296/banned-books-week-annette-curtis-klause/

Doyle, Robert P. Banned Books: Challenging Our Freedom to Read. ALA. 2014.

Klause, Annette Curtis. Blood and Chocolate. Delacorte Press, 1997.

Wheadon, Carrie R. "Blood and Chocolate book review." Common Sense Media. Retrieved 2017 September 29 from https://www.commonsensemedia.org/book-reviews/blood-and-chocolate#

YALSA 1998 Best Books. Retrieved Sept 29, 2017 from https://web.archive.org/web/20061204100859/http://www.ala.org/ala/yalsa/booklistsawards/bestbooksya/1998bestbooks.htm


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"Dances and Dames." Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com). Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/

Blood and Chocolate
By Annette Curtis Klause



The Handmaid's Tale by Margaret Atwood

by Banned Library in ,


The Handmaid's Tale
By Margaret Atwood

We learn about the Handmaid and her/his tale about the alien artifact that brings water back to the world.

Banned

1990 - California - Challenged as assignment at Rancho Cotati High School in Rohnert Park as "too explicit for students"

1992 - Iowa - Challenged yet retained in Waterloo schools for profanity, sexually explicit material, and "statements defamatory to minorities, God, women, and the disabled"

1993 - Massachusetts - Removed from Chicopee High School English class reading list for sex and profanity

1998 - Washington - Challenged with six other titles in Richland high school English classes for being "poor-quality literature and stress suicide, illicit sex, violence, and hopelessness."

1999 - Florida - Challenged but retained on advanced placement reading list in Chamberlain High School in Tampa

2000 - Pennsylvania - Upper Moreland School District downgraded the book from "required" to "optional" on the summer reading list for eleventh graders due to "age-inappropriate" subject matter.

2001 - Texas - Challenged but retained in the Dripping Springs senior Advanced Placement English courses as an optional assignment. Sexual encounters in the book upset some parents.

2006 - Texas - A parent complained to Superintendent Ed Lyman of the Judson school district that the book was "sexually explicit and offensive to Christians" and asked it be removed from an Advanced Placement English curriculum. A committee of teachers, students, and parents recommended the book be retained. The superintendent banned the book against the committee's recommendations. The committee appealed to the school board, which overruled the superintendent and retained the book.

2012 - North Carolina - Parents complained the book was "detrimental to Christian values" and the book was banned for "sexually explicit, violently graphic and morally corrupt" and challenged as required reading for Page High School International Baccaluraeate and optional reading in Advance Placement courses at Grimsley High School.

Sources

Doyle, Robert P. Banned Books: Challenging Our Freedom to Read. ALA. 2014.